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goldberg

Goldberg | Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen

Petri Kumela and Jürgen Ruck, guitar

More informations ...

order: CONTRASTES RECORDS, JPC (incl. audio samples) or HERE

barcsay-nachttraeume

Nacht und Träume
for guitar

on
Stefan Barcsay – Nacht und Träume

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(also available at raccanto)

ChildrensCorner

PlingPlong
for guitar (and punched tape music box)

on
Stefan Barcsay – Children's Corner

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(also available at raccanto or Amazon)

6777335

Caprichos – 1. Francisco Goya y Lucientes, Pintor.
for guitar

on
Jürgen Ruck – Caprichos Goyescos Vol. 1

available at jpc, order code: 6777335
kolibri

Kolibri
for flute (piccolo flute, alto flute) and two guitars

on
Ensemble Maderna – Neue Kammermusik für Flöte, zwei Gitarren und Cello

kreuzberg records, order code: kr 10051

Ansbach

Korinther!
for choir (SSATB) a cappella

on
1250 Jahre Ansbach
EA CD 1202

Chronological Catalogue of Works

 

Os oboi (1991/92) for solo oboe

Klaviertrio (1992) for violin, violoncello, piano
1st Prize in the Forum OST-WEST Composing Competition 1996 in Bergisch Gladbach

Wellen der Kristallisation (1993) for 13 strings (6 vl, 3 vla, 3 vc, db) and darabukka / bass drum

Wiegenlied (1993) for piano
Printout in Münchner Klavierbuch, Neue Klaviermusik für den Unterricht

kyrie / GOTT DU BIST MEIN GOTT. AMEN (1994) for choir (SSAATTBB) with percussion instruments

Klavierstück I »Etüde« (1994)
3rd Prize in the Composing Competition of the Paul Woitschach Foundation

Schwarzer Marsch (1994) for three percussionists

Gloria (1994) for soli (SATB), choir (SSAATTBB), horn, percussion (3 players), harp, harmonium, organ, strings

Engelsgesang (Sanctus) (1994) for solo tuba

Klavierstück II (1995)

Erstes Streichquartett (1995)

Erdenklänge (Credo) (1996) for 18 instruments and tape
flute (doubling piccolo), oboe, clarinet (doubling bass clarinet), 2 bassoons (both doubling contra bassoon), 4 trumpets, tuba, percussion (3 players), harp, piano, 3 double basses

breathe (1996) for oboe and CD playback
Special Prize in the Hochschulwettbewerb für Komposition 1997

Zwei Orchesterstücke (1996/97) for large orchestra
selection for the Saarbrücker Komponistenwerkstatt within the festival „Musik im 20. Jahrhundert“

Orchesterlied (1997) after a poem by Rainer Maria Rilke

Nachtlied (1997) for string sextet (2 vl, 2 vla, 2 vc)
Award Winner in the international Günter Bialas Composing Competition for Chamber Music 1997 in Munich

Drei Lieder nach Gedichten von Heinrich Heine (1997) for voice and piano

Klavierstück III „Sonate“ (1997)

Laut (1997) for solo trombone

Und sah, hörte. (1997) for choir (SATB) and string quintet after texts from the Relevation of St. John
second version for choir (SATB) and string orchestra

TENEBRAE (1998) for soprano and ensemble after three poems by Paul Celan
flute (doubling piccolo), clarinet (doubling bass clarinet), horn, percussion (2 players), piano (2 players), soprano, string quartet

Korinther! (1998) for choir (SSATB) a cappella after texts from the Epistle to the Corinthians
CD production by Ansbacher Jugendkantorei

St Vitus’s Dance (1998) for ensemble and live electronics
flute (doubling piccolo), oboe (doubling english horn), trumpet (doubling cornet), trombone, percussion (1 player), violoncello
Live broadcasting of the world premiere by DeutschlandRadio Berlin

Konzert für Klavier und Orchester (1998)
Last Round of the 7 best entries in the Composing Competition of Christoph Delz Foundation (Basel)

Schlechter Trost
song after a poem by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1999) for violin, soprano, piano

Kolibri (1999) for flute and two guitars
commissioned by Ensemble Maderna
CD recording by Ensemble Maderna

Zweites Streichquartett (1999)

Voices (2000) „Erdenklänge“ (2nd Part) for 12 voices, 2 keyboards, 2 CD players, bariton saxophone

Leichter als Luft (2000) for flute, two guitars, violoncello
commissioned by Prof. Dr. Friedemann W. Schneider, Institut for Physical Chemistry of the University Würzburg

[Hummel-Minute] (2000) for two pianos

Rainmaker (2000) for percussion ensemble (at least 6 players)

live (2001) for voice
commissioned by Eva Resch

Lines, a couple of fields … (2001) for 5 electric guitars
commissioned by ADEvantgarde Festival Munich

Für Orgel und Spieler (2001)

Powerplay (2001) for sextet
oboe, trombone, marimba, acustic guitar, keyboard, double bass

Voices (2001) „Erdenklänge“ (2nd Part)
version for choir (SSAATTBB) a cappella

Guru (2002) Konzert für Gitarre und Ensemble
solo guitar, flute (doubling piccolo nd alto flute), violoncello, accordion, percussion (1 player), soprano, bariton, 2nd guitar
commissioned by Hubert Steiner

Quartett (... zwischen Immer und Nie ...) (2002) for flute, two guitars, accordion
commissioned by Ensemble Maderna

Guru (II) (2002) version for solo guitar

Erdwärts (2002) for accordion
commissioned by Jugend-IKAB

snare alphabet (2002) Hommage à Brian Ferneyhough

organ alphabet (2003) for organ (2 players)

Guru (2. Fassung) (2003) Konzert für Gitarre und Ensemble
solo guitar, flute (doubling piccolo and alto flute), violoncello, accordion, percussion (1 player), clarinet (A), bassoon, 2nd guitar
1st Prize in the International Composing Competition Schweinfurt 2003

Sylphidentänze (2003) for large orchestra
commissioned by young.euro.classic, Europäischer Musik Sommer Berlin
European Composer's Award of the city of Berlin

Caprichos – 1. Francisco Goya y Lucientes, Pintor. (2003) for guitar
commissioned by Staatsgalerie Stuttgart
CD recording by Jürgen Ruck

Caprichos – 32. Por que fue sensible. (2003) for guitar
commissioned by Staatsgalerie Stuttgart

Aureolen (2004) for flute

Von der Einsamkeit dürrer Lieder (2004) after a poem by Tahereh Saffarzadeh translated by Annemarie Schimmel
for soprano, violin, guitar

Caprichos – 59. Y aun no se van! (2004) for piano

Caprichos – 3. Que viene el Coco. (2004) for double bass

Caprichos – 36. Mala noche. (2004) for string steel guitar

three alphabets (2004) for violin and guitar

Guru (II) (2004) version for solo guitar (revised version)

Alliages (2004) for saxophone quartet
commissioned by Alliage Quartett

Klavierstück IV (2005) Ballet for two pianists
commissioned by Kasseler Musiktage

Lautechos (2005) for ensemble
flute, clarinet (B), trumpet (B), trombone, percussion (1 player), harp, piano, violin, viola, violoncello
commissioned by Kasseler Musiktage

Wasser (2005) for solo soprano and choir (SSAATTBB) a cappella
commissioned by Vocalensemble Würzburg

Guru (II) (2005) version for solo guitar (revised version)

Sudden Dance (2006) fro three trumpets, timpani / cymbals and organ

Mixtur (2007) for organ

Position 5 (2007) for six voices and large orchestra

Erde (2007) for choir (SSSAAATTTBBB) a cappella

Regard sur Olivier (2007) for accordion and guitar
commissioned by Stefan Hussong and Jürgen Ruck

Cosm (2008) for flute, cajone and guitar

Marschlied, Aria und Ostinato (2008) for violin, saxophone, piano
commissioned by Trio Comet
alternativ version Ostinato 2010

Drei Orchesterstücke (2008)
1st Prize and Special Prize of the City of Kotka in the II. International Uuno Klami Composition Competition 2009 in Finland

Johann Sebastian Bach, Concerto nach italienischem Gusto (Italian Concerto, BWV 971)
Instrumentation for ensemble (2009)
flute, oboe, clarinet (B), bassoon, 2 horns, timpani, 2 violins, viola, violoncello, double bass
commissioned by Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

Drittes Streichquartett mit Tuba (2009)
commissioned by Beethoven Orchester Bonn

Linienspiel (2009) Quartett über das Lächeln
for trumpet, violoncello, percussion, piano
commissioned by Kasseler Musiktage

Stretto (2009) Variationen in Tempo und Textur
for orchestra
commissioned by Kymi Sinfonietta (Finland)

Nächtens (2009) Song after a poem by Georg Trakl
for mezzo soprano and chamber ensemble

Calypte Anna (2010)
(Anna's Hummingbird) for guitar

Double Concerto (2010)
for quarter-tone accordion, accordion and chamber orchestra
commissioned by the Chamber Orchestra of Lapland (Finland)

Concerto for String Orchestra (2011)
"2. Ansbachisches Konzert"
commissioned by Bachwoche Ansbach

Aureolen (2004/11) version for two flutes

Chimaira (2012) for organ

Goldberg (2011/12) Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen
for two guitars
commissioned by Petri Kumela and Jürgen Ruck

Johann Sebastian Bach, Concerto II BWV 593 (after L'Estro Armonico Op. 3, No. 8 by Antonio Vivaldi)
(2012) transcription for solo violoncello solo and string orchestra
commissioned by Bachwoche Ansbach and Sol Gabetta

PlingPlong (2012) Music with music boxes
for solo guitar
commissioned by Stefan Barcsay
CD recording by Stefan Barcsay

Klaviertrio Nr. 2 (2013) "Ghost"

Aureolen (2013) version for three flutes

Sechs schematische Stücke mit Obertonchoral (2012/13) für Bläserquintett

Fifteen Seconds (2013) for recorder quartet

Spins 'n' Spans (2013) for the 31-tone Fokker organ in Amsterdam
commissioned by Susanne Kujala and Ere Lievonen

Goldberg-Walzer (2013) for punched tape music box

PlingPlongPingPong (2013/14) for punched tape music box and pendulums

Nebensonnen Triptych with Ritornello (2014) for solo horn

Lichtfanfare (2014) for three trumpets and carillon
commissioned by the city of Aschaffenburg

Licht I-III (2014) for three trumpets in three towers
commissioned by the city of Aschaffenburg

Overkill (2014) for punched tape music box and guitar

Fuga ma non troppo (2014) for punched tape music box and pendulums

Unruh (2015) for ensemble in 31-tone equal temperament
commissioned by the Huygens-Fokker Foundation

Im Umlauf (2015) Constellations for trumpet and 12 drums

Nacht und Träume (2015) Lied nach Franz Schubert (Text: Matthäus von Collin) for guitar
commissioned by Stefan Barcsay
CD recording by Stefan Barcsay

A Short Lecture On Irreversible Numbers (2015) for solo trombone
composed for the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy Conservatory Competition

Wolf (2016) for violin and accordion

Gambit (2016) Hommage à une idée for chamber orchestra
commissioned by Tiroler Kammerorchester InnStrumenti
CD recording by Tiroler Kammerorchester InnStrumenti

Nocturne (2017) for guitar

Pixel (2017) for guitar quartet

goldberg

 

 

Goldberg

 

 

Petri Kumela

Jürgen Ruck

Guitars

 

 

 

 

 

Whenever I hear organ music by Johann Sebastian Bach, I always think of the time when I was a young organ student trying to play chorale preludes from the so-called Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) in dark, ice-cold village churches with clammy hands. Ever since, Bach’s music has had something elementary to me: it is the opposite of darkness, cold and trepidation. That is why I love his music, and that is why love his fugues especially. For at the beginning of a fugue, there is always this one very special moment when a theme, having been played by one individual voice, appears in a second voice, while the first develops the counter-voice, thus defining the arena of the action, so to speak. It is a sublime, yet somehow nonchalant moment!

Yet as much as this moment fascinated me and continues to fascinate me, I could not manage to transfer it to my own music. Today, it seems to me that there was a kind of aesthetic block – for a long time, this did not even feel like an encumbrance to me, despite leaving open the question why one would deny oneself a source from which composers have drawn for centuries. With time, through some inner process, my aesthetic positions have lost some of their severity and have broadened, and suddenly – to my considerable surprise and even greater joy – I found myself able to compose contrapuntally. This turning-point is marked by Goldberg. Read more ...

Joachim F.W. Schneider

Translation: Alexa Nieschlag

goldberg

 

 

Goldberg

 

 

Petri Kumela

Jürgen Ruck

Guitars

 

 

 

 

 

Whenever I hear organ music by Johann Sebastian Bach, I always think of the time when I was a young organ student trying to play chorale preludes from the so-called Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) in dark, ice-cold village churches with clammy hands. Ever since, Bach’s music has had something elementary to me: it is the opposite of darkness, cold and trepidation. That is why I love his music, and that is why love his fugues especially. For at the beginning of a fugue, there is always this one very special moment when a theme, having been played by one individual voice, appears in a second voice, while the first develops the counter-voice, thus defining the arena of the action, so to speak. It is a sublime, yet somehow nonchalant moment!

Yet as much as this moment fascinated me and continues to fascinate me, I could not manage to transfer it to my own music. Today, it seems to me that there was a kind of aesthetic block – for a long time, this did not even feel like an encumbrance to me, despite leaving open the question why one would deny oneself a source from which composers have drawn for centuries. With time, through some inner process, my aesthetic positions have lost some of their severity and have broadened, and suddenly – to my considerable surprise and even greater joy – I found myself able to compose contrapuntally. This turning-point is marked by Goldberg.

AriaThe thirty variations of Bach’s Goldberg Variations, which – divided into two parts of 15 variations each – follow an introductory Aria, are arranged in groups of three, each consisting of a canon and two free-form movements. Within the nine canons, the two voices of the canons grow increasingly apart, meaning that in the first canon both voices begin on the same note, but in each following canon, the second voice starts one note higher, until they are divided by nine notes in the last canon. Bach also added a third voice as a free bass line to each canon (with the exception of the last one), resulting in a type of setting that has no immediate model. The free movements resemble familiar forms and genres, such as dance movements, fugues, toccatas and overtures as well as some bravura pieces. The last variation takes the form of a Quodlibet of artfully interwoven popular tunes, and finally the Aria is repeated.

Var9Much of this can also be found in my Goldberg, and although Bach is not quoted literally at any point, he is often present in the background. Thus, the variations also come in groups of three, containing one canon each, and there are also dances (flamenco, ländler, waltzes), old forms (fugues, toccatas and passacaglias) and bravura pieces. Then there are movements referring to my earlier guitar pieces and the playing techniques used therein (Kolibri and Goya), and movements that cannot be assigned to any of the above-mentioned types of movement. The sequence of the canons follows a serial principle in my case too, yet unlike in Bach’s work, it is not the intervals between the two voices of the canon that are decisive, but the proportions of time between the voices. The time ratios descend in order, i.e. 7:6, 7:5, 7:4, 6:5 and so on, all the way to the ideal ratio of 1:1. Thus, apart from the last canon, there is always a faster and a slower voice – the former either catching up with the slower, or falling behind – depending on whether they begin consecutively or simultaneously. In addition, one voice is always the inversion (horizontal mirroring) of the other, for which the Aria already prepares the ground. Var11Last but not least, the first and the last canon also play a special role, not just due to their position, for as in Bach’s canons, they also include additional free voices. Although the technical construction of all the canons is relatively similar, they remain very diverse in character. There is an unrestrained toccata (5:4), a crotchety ländler (2:1), one canon is to be played “with dark calmness” (7:4), another (5:3, Goya) sounds querulous and derisive (as Goya portrays himself in the first of his Caprichos), another accelerates with threatening blows (4:3), and yet another races by in a few seconds, with bizarre grace notes. The nature of the other, free variations is no less diverse. It ranges from ritual delays (Var. 3) and the shimmering Kolibri Variation (Var. 7) to an Adagio (Var. 24) in which crystalline melodies soar over a regular accompaniment. Furthermore, there are the four fugues, which – as indicated above – have a special importance. There are four of them because the Aria also has four structural parts, each of which is developed into a fugue theme. The themes of the first two fugues refer to models in Bach, unlike the last two. Var10Thus, the first fugue is my bow to the Fugue in A-Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier (Part 1) and the second, with its trills and leaps, refers to the Fughetta (Var. 10) of the Goldberg Variations, even though the latter has a completely different character. In the third fugue, an accelerating theme which concurs with a counter-voice slowing down creates a metrically odd, lurching field of tension, while the last one, with its tone repetitions at different tempos and its fifths, conveys a somewhat feverish impression.

Composing variations, some of them extremely short, feels different from writing a work in only one movement or several longer ones. The individual idea takes centre-stage much more strongly and more exclusively, and each final bar feels a bit like pushing a reset button, so that during the process of writing, one has the impression that there are far more moments of new beginnings. Yet there are elements and developmental lines in Goldberg which reach beyond the individual movements. These include rising and falling lines which are already part of the Aria. They can be found explicitly in the counterpoint of the third fugue (Var. 21), during the course of which descending scales become increasingly dominant. Var21They appear chromatically in the bass line of the Boogie-Woogie Variation 12 and very clearly as a parody “melody” in the waltz (Var. 27). Like Bach’s Variation 26, Variation 22 features two structures of demisemiquavers and quaver impulses which keep crossing each other. Throughout the entire work, the microtonal parts of the tone material gain increasing independence, culminating in the last canon (Var. 29). The microtones located between the conventional tones defined by the guitar’s frets are first prepared subliminally by the glissando structure in Variation 13. Var13They are introduced for good by the diffuse bell sounds at the beginning of Part 2 (Var. 16), reminiscent of the Aria. In Variation 18 microtones are first heard in clear definition, as equals of the conventional tones and indistinguishable from them. The fact that the guitars take turns here makes the movement seem like a microtonally ornamented version of the Aria resounding from another, far-off world. There, in this intermediate world, is also where we might find the Music Box (Var. 19), for in this short movement we hear only notes which are located exactly in the middle between two frets (quarter-tones). Only the very last note, which is played normally again, ends this wondrously enraptured episode. Towards the end, in the penultimate variation, it becomes apparent that a process of division has occurred, for the last, simple and almost fragmentary canon features the tonal material in two layers: the actual voices of the canon in the customary tonal system, and their delicate, fragile accompaniment consisting of microtonal material. At the same time, the disposition of the time ratios reaches the somehow unreal ratio of 1:1, caused by the simultaneous beginning of the two voices of the canon. This brings Variation 29 into a state of strange yet final order. However, despite many developments reaching their end point in this movement, I find that a term like “end” or “finale” does not seem appropriate, for everything seems too delicate, too fragile. In this spirit, there is nothing for the following, last variation to continue, and therefore it is quite different: there are no concrete pitches, rhythm can only be detected as a pulse, and instead of strict construction, the players are given choices. Thus, the Quodlibet mediates between a final stage or Fine and the beginning of the recurring Aria.

Joachim F.W. Schneider

Translation: Alexa Nieschlag

New Publications

goldberg

CD

CONTRASTES RECORDS has published my work Goldberg | Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen on CD which also includes 6 choral preludes from the "Orgelbüchlein" by J.S. Bach transcripted for two guitars (by J. Ruck).

All pieces are played by Petri Kumela and Jürgen Ruck.

More informations and order:

CONTRASTES RECORDS, JPC (incl. audio samples) or HERE

 

 

 

cd cover tkalec

CD

Joachim F.W. Schneider:
A Short Lecture On Irreversible Numbers
for solo trombone

Zan Zkalec, trombone
(1st Prize Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy Competition 2016)

 

Tracklist and order ...

 

Goldberg - Tracking List

Joachim F.W. Schneider: Goldberg | Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen

01. speaker Aria (2’02) • 02. Variation 1 (1’07) • 03. Variation 2 (Kanon 7:6) (1’42) • 04. Variation 3 (4’28) • 05. Variation 4 (1’18) • 06. speaker Variation 5 (Kanon 7:5) (0’42) • 07. Variation 6 (Musik aus Glas) (1’14) • 08. speaker Variation 7 (“Kolibri”) (1’35) • 09. speaker Variation 8 (Kanon 7:4) (2’03) • 10. speaker Variation 9 (“Flamenco”) (1’31) • 11. speaker Variation 10 (Fuga a 3 voci) (1’04) • 12. speaker Variation 11 (Kanon 6:5) (1’28) • 13. Variation 12 (nicht zu breit) (0’47) • 14. speaker Variation 13 (0’27) • 15. Variation 14 (Kanon 5:4, Toccata) (0’37) • 16. Variation 15 (Fuga a 4 voci) (3’35) • 17. Variation 16 (1’44) • 18. Variation 17 (Kanon 5:3, “Goya”) (0’45) • 19. Variation 18 (1’46) • 20. Variation 19 (“Spieluhr”) (1’20) • 21. Variation 20 (Kanon 4:3) (0’58) • 22. speaker Variation 21 (Fuga a 3 voci) (2’12) • 23. Variation 22 (0’52) • 24. Variation 23 (Kanon 3:2) (0’25) • 25. Variation 24. Adagio, sempre rubato (4’30) • 26. Variation 25 (Fuga a 4 voci) (1’32) • 27. Variation 26 (Kanon 2:1) (0’48) • 28. speaker Variation 27 (Walzer) (2’10) • 29. Variation 28 (“Passacaglia- Miniatur”) (0’36) • 30. Variation 29 (Kanon 1:1) (1’02) • 31. Variation 30 (Quodlibet) (1’27) • 32. Aria da Capo e Fine (2’09)

‚Äč

Johann Sebastian Bach: 6 Choralvorspiele aus dem Orgel-Büchlein
Bearbeiter: Jürgen Ruck

33. “Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ” BWV 639 (2’57) • 34. “Nun komm’ der Heiden Heiland” BWV 599 (1’02) • 35. “O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig” BWV 618 (2’37) • 36. “Herr Gott, nun schleuß den Himmel auf ” BWV 617 (2’09) • 37. “Das alte Jahr vergangen ist” BWV 614 (2’10) • 38. speaker “Alle Menschen müssen sterben” BWV 643 (1’54)

Total Time: 63’00